Nov 17, 2011
Chris Weiss

World’s Smallest Electric Car

If you had to guess what the world’s smallest electric car is, you’d probably think of a tiny single passenger or 1+1 like the Audi Urban Concept. Maybe an electric transporter like the GM ENV.

But you’d actually have to think much, much smaller to come up with the correct answer. Scientists in Norway recently created an “electric car” that is but a single molecule.

This electric car won’t get you to the grocery store, but it is an interesting development in science. The molecule is made up of four separate branches that act like wheels. Scientists used a very fine metal point from what’s called a scanning tunnelling microscope. The point ends in a single atom and when it’s placed near the car-like molecule some of its electrons jump to the molecule, causing the “wheels” to change shape and move the car forward.

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Nov 15, 2011
Clay Ritchings

The Electrified Chevrolet

Way before the Volt was unveiled by Chevrolet to the Coolaid drinking EV enthusiastic masses, there were other lesser known electric vehicles with the bow tie that helped pave the way for what we are being force fed today.

The evolution of Chevrolets electric cars starts long before the EV1 that was made famous by the 2006 documentary “Who killed the electric car” a film that explores the creation, limited commercialization, and subsequent destruction of the battery electric vehicle in the United States, specifically the General Motors EV1 of the mid 1990s.

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Nov 10, 2011
Clay Ritchings

2012 Volvo Plug-in Hybrid Diesel Not Making it to U.S Soil

We are not worthy—unfortunately, the news from Volvo isn’t good for the U.S. It seems Executives at Volvo don’t think the U.S is ready for a plug-in diesel hybrid. Therefore we will get a gasoline-electric hybrid, but everyone else will receive the diesel-electric hybrid.

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Nov 9, 2011
James Warham

Are Hybrid cars really Eco-Friendly?

Are Hybrid cars really Eco-friendly? What happens to all those batteries after the car has gone past it’s useful life? There are reports out there that claim the battery production impact alone far out ways any positive impact that driving a Hybrid car will do.

There are hundreds of thousand hybrid cars on the roads in the U.S. In addition, more and more hybrid cars are being sold and the dealerships of these fuel efficient vehicles are celebrating the record sales. But several environmentalists this might lead to a problem. They are afraid that the hybrid outbreak might turn into nickel hydride battery pollution. Environmentalists say hybrid cars batteries, since they do not last lifelong, would end up scattered in landfills and contaminate the soil.

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Nov 9, 2011
Stephanie L

A Case For Hydrogen Fuel Cell Cars

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Cars

Fuel cell cars have the potential to reduce the demand for foreign oil and lower the harmful effects it has on our climate. These cars run on hydrogen rather than gas and their exhaust doesn’t put out any harmful fumes, just water and heat. A lot of challenges will have to be overcome before these vehicles can compete with hybrids and regular gasoline vehicles, but the benefits of this technology could be very substantial to our environment and everyone living in it.

Conventional vehicles produce a significant amount of air pollutants that contribute to smog and other harmful particles in the US. The hydrogen is produced by fossil fuels resulting in some pollutants, but much less than other vehicles. However, since hydrogen can also come from domestic sources such as natural gas, coal and water, fuel cell cars would decrease the demand for foreign oil. This would make our economy less dependent on oil transport from other countries and we would be less vulnerable to price shocks from the increasingly volatile oil market.

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Nov 7, 2011
Peter C Sessler

Comparing Hybrid Cars to Traditional Ones

Comparing Hybrid Cars to Traditional Ones

No doubt about it, gas prices are inching their way up and consumers are trying to save – even if the savings are small. Consumers are now evaluating whether they should make the plunge to hybrid cars, especially as the Green Movement expands. They are finding out that hybrid cars can cost less over the long haul – something that has not been true in the past.

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Nov 2, 2011
Dave Walter

KBB’s Mitsubishi i Review

Although the i won’t be available in the US until next year, writers from Kelley Blue Book were able to test drive Mitsubishi’s new EV in Japan.

Check out KBB’s video review…

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Nov 2, 2011
Dave Walter

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Nov 1, 2011
Dave Walter

Living with the Chevy Volt: 1,000 miles, 11 gallons and a lot of fun

A Chevy Volt owner shares his experience with his new Volt and compares it to driving a Toyota Prius. Via Auto Blog Green

The 2012 Chevy Volt you see above is a little different from those that have been poked, photographed, and test driven on this page in the past. First, this one is a little dusty, with 1,000 miles on its plug-in hybrid power train. This one is also a 2012, with some subtle changes from the 2011 version. However, the biggest difference between this Chevy Volt and others seen on this site is that this one is sitting in my driveway.

This is my Volt, picked up two weeks ago as one of the first available in my area. For 2012, Chevy made available the color “Summit White,” also known as just plain old white. Since the Volt has lots of thick black accents, I went with the white thinking NASA, Space Shuttle and Saturn V. As it turns out, everyone who has seen the car has immediately mentioned Star Wars and Stormtroopers. That works, too. For the interior, I reversed the scheme of the outside, picking the bright white accents on black leather (a new combo for 2012). It’s not exactly the most subtle car in the world, but I like it.

I traded in my much-beloved 2004 Toyota Prius for this latest bit of automotive kit, which I know is bound to raise some voices in protest. After all, the Prius had brought me more than 100,000 miles of 50+ mpg, worry-free driving, so trading it away doesn’t represent a big (if any) net gain for the environment. However, it’s not as if my Prius is about to become a paperweight. Someone else will take over driving that car, while I take advantage of the temporary government kickback to do just what such incentives are intended to do: support bringing new technology to the marketplace. According to GM, more than 10 percent of new Volt owners have traded in an existing hybrid, which is pretty much what you would expect. Few people currently driving Hummers are likely to think of the Volt as their obvious next purchase.

Oct 29, 2011
James Warham

Hydrogen Vehicles—Where Are They Now?

I have not been a big fan of the EV revolution—sorry tree huggers, I do not feel that they are ready for “prime time” or worth the cost. Yes they are pricey but the cost of using more fossil fuels to produce electricity on a grid that has already shown that in summer months, can’t handle the loads now. Now introduce charging stations, additional home consumption to charge the EV’s and all the additional electric conveniences that we will surely add to our lives and I think it spells disaster.

Just building electric cars and calling it a day will never break us from foreign oil—but that’s a discussion for another time and place. So what are the car manufacturers to do? How about thinking outside the box and coming up with some really clean viable energy.

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